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  #1  
Old 1st May 2014, 07:41 AM
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Default Blueberry Recipes


(wild blueberry)


(cultivated bush blueberry)

The genus Vaccinium has a mostly circumpolar distribution with species in North America, Europe, Asia, and Africa.

Many commercially sold species with English common names including "blueberry" are currently classified in section Cyanococcus of the genus Vaccinium and come predominantly from North America. Many North American native species of blueberries are grown commercially in the Southern Hemisphere in Australia, New Zealand and South American nations.

Several other wild shrubs of the genus Vaccinium also produce commonly eaten blue berries, such as the predominantly European Vaccinium myrtillus and other bilberries, that in many languages have a name that translates "blueberry" in English.

Nutrients, phytochemicals and research

Blueberries have a diverse range of micronutrients, with moderate levels (relative to respective Dietary Reference Intakes) of the essential dietary mineral manganese, vitamin C, vitamin K and dietary fiber.

One serving provides a relatively low glycemic load score of 4 out of 100 per day.

Blueberries contain anthocyanins, other pigments and various phytochemicals, which are under preliminary research for their potential role in reducing risks of diseases such as inflammation and cancer.

Similar to red grape, blueberries may contain resveratrol.

Most polyphenol studies have been conducted using the highbush cultivar of blueberries (V. corymbosum), while content of polyphenols and anthocyanins in lowbush (wild) blueberries (V. angustifolium) exceeds values found in highbush cultivars.

In preliminary research, feeding blueberries to rats reduced brain damage in experimental stroke and may cause increased production of vascular nitric oxide that influences blood pressure regulation.

Additional research showed that blueberry consumption in rats altered glycosaminoglycans that are vascular cell components affecting control of blood pressure.

Other preliminary studies found blueberry consumption lowered cholesterol and total blood lipid levels, possibly affecting symptoms of heart disease. Wild South American varieties may contain higher levels of polyphenols, but this finding remains unconfirmed and uncertain of its significance.

Other preliminary research showed that supplementation of diets with wild blueberry juice may benefit the brain, improve memory and learning in older adults, while possibly reducing blood sugar and symptoms of depression.

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Blueberry is a plant. People use the fruit and leaves to make medicine.

Be careful not to confuse blueberry with bilberry. Outside of the United States, the name “blueberry” may be used for a plant called “bilberry” in the U.S.

Blueberry is used for preventing cataracts and glaucoma and for treating ulcers, urinary tract infections (UTIs), multiple sclerosis (MS), chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), colic, fever, varicose veins, and hemorrhoids. Blueberry is also used for improving circulation, and as a laxative.

Some women use blueberry for labor pains and as a tonic after miscarriage.

The dried fruit and leaves are used for diarrhea.

Tea made from the dried leaves is used for sore throat and swelling (inflammation) of the mouth or the skin lining the throat.

Health providers have used blueberry juice as a contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Contrast agents make it possible for radiologists to see and interpret the images.

Some people inhale the fumes of burning dried blueberry flowers for treatment of insanity.

How does it work?

Blueberry, like its relative the cranberry, might help prevent bladder infections by stopping bacteria from attaching to the walls of the bladder. Blueberry fruit is high in fiber which could help normal digestive function. It also contains vitamin C and other antioxidants.

http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-suppl....Name=BLUEBERRY
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Old 1st May 2014, 07:43 AM
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Blueberry Almond Cornmeal Coffee Cake



Ingredients
•1/2 cup all purpose flour
•1/2 cup fine ground corn meal
•1/2 cup sugar
•1/2 teaspoon salt
•3/4 teaspoon baking powder
•1/4 teaspoon baking soda
•1/4 cup unsweetened applesauce
•1/3 cup soy yogurt, blueberry flavor
•2 tablespoons margarine, melted
•1/2 tablespoon apple juice
•1 teaspoon vanilla extract
•1/4 teaspoon almond extract
•1 cup fresh blueberries
•1/2 cup almonds, sliced
•1 tablespoon brown sugar
•1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Directions
•Preheat oven to 350 farenheigt/175 C for 15 minutes.
•Grease a 8 inch square baking dish with margarine.
•In a small bowl combine the almonds, brown sugar and cinnamon, and set aside.
•Melt the margarine on the store or in the microwave.
•Combine together the flour, whole cornmeal, sugar, baking powder, salt and baking soda in a large bowl.
•A the yogurt to a measuring cup, fill it with water until you have 1/2 cup. Whisk together well.
•Stir the wet ingredients into dry ingredients until just moistened. Fold in 2/3 cup blueberries.
•Pour the batter into the prepared pan. Top with remaining blueberries. Sprinkle the almond mixture on top. Tap the pan lightly a couple times so that the topped blueberries and almonds sticks to the batter.
•Bake for 25-30 minutes or until a toothpick inserted near the center comes out clean. Cool the pan on a wire rack.
•Remove the cake from the pan after 10 minutes and transfer the cake directly to the wire rack. The cake is quite light, so you will have to be very careful while tilting the pan.

Source: http://vegantasty.com/2010/09/bluebe...l-coffee-cake/
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Old 1st May 2014, 07:45 AM
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Blueberry Cheesecake Bars



Ingredients

•2 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
•1 cup graham cracker crumbs (about 6 whole graham crackers)
•1 (8 ounce) package fat free cream cheese, softened
•1 (8 ounce package) reduced fat cream cheese, softened
•¾ cup sugar
•2 large eggs
•1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
•1 teaspoon lemon juice
•1 (10 ounce) jar blueberry fruit spread
•1 cup blueberries

Instructions

1.Preheat the oven to 350F/175 C. Mix butter and graham cracker crumbs in a 9x13-inch baking pan. Press the mixture firmly into the bottom of the pan creating a thin even layer. Refrigerate while you prepare the filling.
2.In a large mixing bowl beat the cream cheeses with an electric mixer on medium high until creamy. Add sugar, eggs, vanilla, and lemon juice and beat until creamy and well blended.
3.Stir the fruit spread around in the jar until it is spreadable and then spread it evenly over the crust. Sprinkle blueberries over the jam. Spread the cream cheese mixture evenly over the blueberries.
4.Bake for 30 minutes, until set and slightly puffed. Remove from the oven and allow to cool to room temperature before covering with plastic wrap and placing in the refrigerator to chill completely. Cut into 32 bars

Nutritional Estimates Per Serving (1 bar): 108 calories, 5.4 g fat, 12.6 g carbs, 0 g fiber, 1.9 g protein and 3 Weight Watchers PointsPlus

Source: http://simple-nourished-living.com/2...eesecake-bars/
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Old 1st May 2014, 07:55 AM
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Blueberry Oat Scones



Ingredients

½ cup all-purpose flour
½ cup whole wheat pastry flour (or white wheat flour)
1 cup old-fashioned rolled oats (uncooked)
2 tablespoons firmly packed light or dark brown sugar
1 tablespoon baking powder
⅛ teaspoon salt
¼ cup butter, cut into little pieces
½ cup, fresh blueberries
¾ cup half-and-half (See Note)
2 teaspoons old-fashioned oats (optional)
1 teaspoon sugar (optional)


Position a rack in the center of the oven and preheat to 350 F/175 C. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicone liner (or lightly grease it).

In a large bowl, whisk together the flours, oats, brown sugar, baking powder, and salt.

Add the butter and using a pastry blender or your fingertips, work it into the flour mixture until it's crumbly and just a few pea-size pieces of butter remain.

Add blueberries.

Gradually add the half-and-half while mixing continuously and continue to mix until the dough comes together. (The dough will be very sticky.)

Drop ⅓ cup mounds of the dough onto prepared baking sheet, spacing them about 3 inches apart. If desired, sprinkle the tops with the additional 2 teaspoons of oats and teaspoon of sugar.

Bake the scones for 25-30 minutes, until the centers are firm to the touch and they are slightly golden in color.

Remove from the oven and transfer the scones to a rack for cooling before serving.


Nutritional Estimates Per Serving (1 scone): 213 calories, 10.5 g fat, 26.2 g carbs, 1.7 g fiber, 4.3 g protein and 6 Weight Watchers PointsPlus

Source: http://simple-nourished-living.com/2...ry-oat-scones/

Note: The term “half and half” shows up very frequently in cooking and baking recipes in the US, but it is not particularly well known outside of the US (or the term refers to something completely different). When it appears in a recipe, it sometimes generates a little confusion as to what it is. “Half and half” is a mixture of half heavy cream and half whole milk that is commonly found in the US. Heavy cream has a fat percentage of about 35% and that concentration of fat is what helps stabilize it when you whip it into whipped cream. Half and half has a fat percentage around 12% and, although much thicker and creamier than milk, it will not whip up into fluffy whipped cream like heavy cream will.

You can substitute for half and half by mixing half whole milk and half heavy cream. IF you live in a county where “light cream” is widely available, know that it has a slightly higher fat content than half and half and should be mixed with approximately one third whole milk to make a substitute for half and half.
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Old 5th May 2014, 09:09 AM
nipias nipias is offline
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Saliha,
Thank you for the 'Blueberry Recipes'.
I like all photos, especially the 'Blueberry Almond Cornmeal Coffee Cake' photo first.
Yummy!
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Old 11th May 2014, 09:40 AM
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Default Blueberry Custard Tarts



Ingredients:
2 eggs, beaten
4 Tablespoons granulated sugar
6 Tablespoons heavy cream or milk (2% or richer)
100 grams Blueberries (or more or less, as desired) *Note
Ready-made Pastry crust for 6 tart tins.

Directions:

Pre-heat oven to 180 C/356 F . Line the pastry tin with the pastry crust. Divide the blueberries among the pastry tins using as many blueberries as desired (remember, more berries = less room for custard!).

In a small bowl, combine eggs, sugar and cream. Stir until well blended. Pour into the tart tins, taking care not to over-fill the crust. Place tart tins in the center of oven and bake for 20-25 minutes, or until crust is lightly browned and filling appears set.

Remove and allow to cool completely before serving.

Source: http://spiceinthecity.wordpress.com/...sserts/page/4/

* Note: 100 g = 0.220462 lb / 1/4 of a pound / 3.5274 oz
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Old 30th July 2015, 06:53 PM
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Bilberry/Blueberry Oat Pie



100 g butter or margarine
100 ml sugar
1 egg
300 ml oatmeals
100 ml wheat flour
1 tsp baking powder
500 ml bilberries or blueberries
(1 tablespoon sugar)

Cream together softened margarine or butter and sugar in the bowl. Add the egg. Mix dry ingreadients together, then add to the bowl. Stir gently. Spread to the greased pie dish. Add bilberries/blueberries. Add sugar if desired. Bake at +175 C for 30 minutes.
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Old 27th January 2016, 05:49 PM
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Rice Porridge in oven and Blueberry Soup



1 liter milk
1,5 dl sticky rice
0,5 tsp salt
2 tbsp butter

Grease a baking dish, add the milk, salt and rinsed rice. Allow to simmer in the oven about 1.5 - 2 hours. Stir a couple of times a baking of the first half. The oven temperature of 175 - 200 degrees C.

Enjoy with berry soup or milk, cinnamon and sugar.


Blueberry Soup

8 dl water 
5 dl blueberries 
1 dl sugar 
2 tablespoons potato flour 
½ dl water 

Measure water and blueberries in a saucepan, boil for 5-10 minutes. Pour through a strainer, and squeeze the blueberries with a large plastic bucket or a spoon through a sieve. Add sugar and bring to a boil. Mix with potato flour and cold water together and add the mixture to a saucepan in a thin strip carefully stirring. Let the soup boil without stirring.


Other version:

400 ml fresh or frozen bilberries
200 ml water
100 - 150 ml sugar

Pour the bilberries, water and sugar in a saucepan.

Bring the mixture slowly to the boil, crushing the berries with a spoon or a pounder. Cook the mixture for a few minutes, then strain it through a fine sieve. Store covered in refrigerator.
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